Tag Archives: second chance

No Mulligans for Mickelson

Mulligan — a “do over” in golf.

Today’s story is about British Open winner Phil Mickelson.

Phil Mickelson just won the British Open. Some say it’s his most important win to date. But as a father, “Lefty” might disagree.

Reflect back 14 years…

It was the morning of June 17, 1999. Mickelson teed off in his first U.S. Open. If that’s not pressure enough…

His wife, Amy, back home in Arizona, was ready to deliver their first child. They had a deal — Amy would page Phil if she went into labor. He would walk off the course and fly home. Phil understood there would be other tournaments, but there would be no do over, no mulligan on the birth of their child.

Phil Mickelson

Phil Mickelson

On the last day of the tournament, on the 18th green, Payne Stewart drained a fifteen footer for par, beating Mickelson by one stroke. In a memorable moment, Stewart promptly walked over to Mickelson, grabbed him by the cheeks and said, “You’re going to love being a father.”

Phil’s wife did go into labor during the Open, but she didn’t alert the soon to be dad! Fortunately, it was a slow labor, and Phil made it back in time.

His daughter, Amanda, was born the next day. READ MORE 

Mom’s Second Life — A Second Chance

She almost died. That’s why she lived.

Today’s story is from Yonsenia White.

Arnetta White. My mother. Born in poverty. The youngest of twelve. She faced racism, sexism and segregation. And a troubled marriage, as well.

Mom was our rock.

Kevin (standing left), Keith (seated), Mrs. Arnetta White, Mr. Henry White (Yon’s father), Me (infant)

After Dad left, Mom filled both parenting roles. She shined at both. We rarely felt an absence of dad.

But she never complained. Her strength of character and faith in God got us all through some difficult times. Her heart was so big, her effort so great; she made many sacrifices for us. In all of my life, I‘ve seen Mom cry only twice.

She raised my brothers and me on a housekeeper’s salary. Her venue each day: twenty-some rooms on a nursing home floor. Climbing ladders. Changing curtains. Mopping floors. Removing trash. For anyone—especially a heavyset woman of 60 — backbreaking work.

Then it happened. Mom suddenly became tired, light-headed, but wanted to finish her housekeeping duties. When she got home, she felt a lot worse. My brother rushed her to the hospital. READ MORE