Tag Archives: mom

Burnt Finger

“Experience is a hard teacher, because she gives the test first, the lesson afterward.”

— Vernon Sanders Law

Today’s story is contributed by Risa Nye.

When I was a little girl, my mom had to go to the hospital a few times. I don’t remember why exactly, but I do remember how things were different around the house when my dad was in charge.

burnt finger


He liked to cook us breakfast in the morning, and always made us try to guess “the secret ingredient” — in our eggs, our Cream of Wheat, or our pancakes. It was usually cheese, but sometimes he surprised us with something else.

And, let’s just say he allowed us do things we weren’t allowed to do when Mom was around. There is one event in particular that’s seared into my memory, for reasons that will become obvious. Here’s the way I remember it: READ MORE 

My Dad’s Name was Mom

“It’s not easy being a mother. If it were easy, fathers would do it.”

—The Golden Girls

Today’s story is from Brandon Steiner.

Brandon Steiner's book

Brandon Steiner’s book

“You Gotta’ Have Balls” is Brandon Steiner’s inspiring book about how he grew up as a dirt-poor Jewish boy with no dad and no money. He and his mom got by on welfare stamps.

Things worked out. Today, his Steiner Sports is a multi-million dollar international brand, the heaviest hitter in the sports memorabilia world. Brandon is also a big-hearted guy and a valued, “What can I do for you?” personal friend.

How did he do it? “My mom,” Brandon proudly tells Savvy Dad.

Brandon Steiner's mom

Brandon’s mom Evelyn Steiner

“I had no dad. We had no money. But Mom took no excuses. She was forced to wear the ‘dad hat,’ and she wore it well. Mom would say, “I’m your mom and your dad too, so whatever I say goes double!”

We asked Brandon to share the most valuable lessons he learned from this remarkable woman, who served as both mom and dad. He asked that we share three, and you don’t mess with kids from Brooklyn, so here they are: READ MORE 

Burnt Biscuit

“A healthy attitude is contagious but don’t wait to catch it from others. Be a carrier.”

—Tom Stoppard

Today’s story is from Art Ernst.

Burnt biscuit

Art Ernst

Most Savvy Dad stories are special. Some are what we call 10+. That means as good as they get. On that scale, this is an 11.

We found this story floating around the Internet in different forms, “author unknown”. A bit of detective work by our own Chris Neck turned up the original author, original story and some very cool background.

Heat up your coffee. Pour some more tea. Savor this moment. You’re in for a treat.

We’ll start with the email Chris received from the now 85-year old author. Then, in its original form, enjoy one of most touching dad stories (and best life lessons) you’ll ever read. READ MORE 

Beauty & the Beast

Today’s story is from Pat McMahon.

I’m sure you know the story of “Beauty and the Beast.” But what you probably don’t know is… I’m their son.

No, I don’t mean the couple in the children’s story. But, it would have been perfectly appropriate to call my parents Beauty and the Beast because that’s the way they talked about themselves.

Beauty is a light in the heart.

Pat teaching his dad Jack a thing or two, age 5.

You see, before my father and mother met and went into the entertainment business, my dad was a prizefighter — a professional boxer with over 90 fights. Back in those days, they didn’t check personal information very carefully, so he was able to get into the fight game when he was 14 years old.

He had a pretty impressive record too, but it was at the expense of his face — layers of scar tissue that built up on his brow, a nose broken so many times it spread in multiple directions. How he ever heard anything through the tiny pinholes of his “Cauliflower” ears is a wonder.

And then there was my mom, The Beauty. She was the essence of the song “Tiny Dancer.” Mom was a petite ballerina, a tap dancer, a skilled acrobat. READ MORE 

Mother to None. Mom to Thousands.

“Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys; look on them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death.”

—Sun Tzu

Today’s story is from Kaziah Hancock.

A mother to none. Cervical cancer robbed her of that. But in a sense, she is a mom to thousands.


Kaziah’s first portrait of a fallen soldier:
James Cawley of Utah.

Fallen soldiers. They are her daughters and sons. She’s never met a single one, but she’s loved — and mourned — many. They gave their lives protecting our country. She brings them to life on canvas. She gives them a presence in homes left behind. A lasting memory for those they loved most.

Kaziah Hancock is sometimes referred to as the Goat Woman. She lives on a small ranch in Utah with, you guessed it… about 100 goats. She’s a big-hearted lady who exudes independence and strength. To do what she does, you could be nothing less.

She explains in a news interview, “I don’t know how political I am. I don’t get into all that crap. I just love freedom, ok?” READ MORE 

Mom’s Second Life — A Second Chance

She almost died. That’s why she lived.

Today’s story is from Yonsenia White.

Arnetta White. My mother. Born in poverty. The youngest of twelve. She faced racism, sexism and segregation. And a troubled marriage, as well.

Mom was our rock.

Kevin (standing left), Keith (seated), Mrs. Arnetta White, Mr. Henry White (Yon’s father), Me (infant)

After Dad left, Mom filled both parenting roles. She shined at both. We rarely felt an absence of dad.

But she never complained. Her strength of character and faith in God got us all through some difficult times. Her heart was so big, her effort so great; she made many sacrifices for us. In all of my life, I‘ve seen Mom cry only twice.

She raised my brothers and me on a housekeeper’s salary. Her venue each day: twenty-some rooms on a nursing home floor. Climbing ladders. Changing curtains. Mopping floors. Removing trash. For anyone—especially a heavyset woman of 60 — backbreaking work.

Then it happened. Mom suddenly became tired, light-headed, but wanted to finish her housekeeping duties. When she got home, she felt a lot worse. My brother rushed her to the hospital. READ MORE 

Mom Saved My Life

If you don’t read this, you lose. It’s that touching. It’s that good.

Today’s story is from Chloe Veron

Chloe Veron is 21, a junior at Harvard. I’m sure she has a remarkable dad. I know she has a remarkable mom.

Mom saved my life

Mom Joy and Chloe

Chloe’s mother saved her life … and her sister Annie’s … and her brother Elliot’s, but paid a dear price. Chloe and her sister Annie, produced one of the most heart-warming, videos I’ve ever seen. It’s a well-deserved tribute to an incredible mom.

At Savvy Dad, we normally talk about dads. For Mother’s Day, it’s our privilege to honor one amazing mom. After seeing the video (and shedding a tear with Roseann), I sent a message to Chloe in the hope that she might share a photo and perhaps a comment or two. We had not met or communicated before.

Here’s what she wrote back:    READ MORE